Abstract

African american doctor living with diabetes paper

Author(s): Malik Muhammad

I’m an African American psychologist living with type 2 diabetes. I have to admit that from the announcement of my diagnosis I was a difficult patient. With all of my education, I protested, I rebelled, I denied what was happening to me. I was angry at the medical profession. I was angry at my body. I was angry at the hand fate had dealt me. Looking back, I see now that I was grieving. It was essential that I accepted the fact that my lifestyle would never be the same because my body was in distress. I had to acknowledge the changes I needed to make were also the very changes my medical providers had been suggesting for years (e.g. work out a little more, try to cut out fast food, eat a healthier diet). That came in time, but what I needed most was a setting where I could vent, where I could be heard, where my anger would be validated as normal, where I could get beyond the shock and start partnering with my medical providers. Instead, I was told to make an appointment for a six-month check up to test my blood levels again and to use the time in between to see if I could manage my diabetes without medication I’m an African American psychologist living with type 2 diabetes. I have to admit that from the announcement of my diagnosis I was a difficult patient. With all of my education, I protested, I rebelled, I denied what was happening to me. I was angry at the medical profession. I was angry at my body. I was angry at the hand fate had dealt me. Looking back, I see now that I was grieving. It was essential that I accepted the fact that my lifestyle would never be the same because my body was in distress. I had to acknowledge the changes I needed to make were also the very changes my medical providers had been suggesting for years (e.g. work out a little more, try to cut out fast food, eat a healthier diet). That came in time, but what I needed most was a setting where I could vent, where I could be heard, where my anger would be validated as normal, where I could get beyond the shock and start partnering with my medical providers. Instead, I was told to make an appointment for a six-month checkup to test my blood levels again and to use the time in between to see if I could manage my diabetes without medication.


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